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LOCALLY GROWN, ORGANIC PRODUCE DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR.

'MATER MADNESS - TOMATO PRE-SALE

04/28/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

We just finished planting 49,440 tomato plants! It's like farmers gone wild over here at JBG. We are caught in a tizzy of tomatoes, and want to extend a special offer to you. For this week only, we’re having a bulk tomato pre-sale. We will be offering 25 lbs of our mouth-watering beef steak slicing tomatoes for $50! That’s right, you heard us! This is a discounted price from our regular bulk sale prices in June and July. Beef steak tomatoes are our favorite variety for BLTs, hamburgers, and tomato sandwiches. They are great for slicing, dicing, juicing, canning, roasting, saucing, sandwiches, and salads. These are the all-around tomato and are sweet, juicy, and delectable! Pre-order them now, and we will deliver them to a farmers’ marker of your choice during the peak of our tomato season. Projected delivery dates are between June 1st and June 30th. We will contact you to schedule your pickup day.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Why all the pre-sale hype? Well, this year’s ‘mater harvest should be one for the books. We have chosen some exquisite varieties for you this year, and we should have quite the bumper crop. Every time we walk by our rows of tomatoes, our mouths start watering at the thought of farm-fresh BLTs, bright tomato sauces, and perhaps our favorite way to enjoy a homegrown tomato - sliced thick with salt, pepper, and a bit of olive oil. We got that ‘mater mania! How can you not start ruminating on salsa, homemade ketchup, margherita pizza, marinara sauce, caprese salad, and all the summertime sweetness when waltzing through the vastness of the tomato fields? We love the succulent produce that comes with the impending and sweltering heat. We listed some all-star food blog recipes below to get you pondering and perusing what you will be making with your tomatoes this season.

Tomato fields forever. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Tomato fields forever. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Tomato fields forever x 2. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Tomato fields forever x 2. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Tomato field panorama. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Tomato field panorama. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Love tomatoes, but struggle with finding good recipes? Look no further:

Photo by Mackenzie Smith. Photo by Mackenzie Smith.






Pre-order your 'maters now! We promise they're just like the ones your momma grew! (Or daddy, or grandpaw, or Uncle Bob...)

Looking to work on the farm? We are looking to hire a Greenhouse Manager as soon as possible! Check out more info here.

Want to help us with our tomato bounty? We have a tomato work-day coming up on May 6th. Interested volunteers can email volunteer@jbgorganic.com with “tomato volunteering” in subject line. We always appreciate the smiles and help!

WEEK 17 IN PHOTOS

04/28/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Will. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Will. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Week 17 has tomatoes on our minds... We've planted almost 50,000 tomato plants, and this year's crop should be one of our best yet. Chompin' at the bit, and want to pre-order some tomatoes? Check out our special weeklong pre-sale here.

Our Victoria Red Table grapes are three years old now (vineyard images below), and are maturing wonderfully. A huge shout-out goes to Andrew Labay for talking with our Farm Manager and Head Grower about growing grapes in Texas. He mentioned something very interesting while he met with us - seasoned grape growers do not recommend cultivating grapes organically (because they are sensitive to pests and disease); however, our grapes look terrific! He was immensely excited about our experiment since there aren't many organic growers in the area. He is thrilled to be working with us, and is invaluable in helping us navigate the challenges we face that are different from conventional growers.

On top of that, we are ready to start constructing the trellis system for one of our newest crops, the muscadines! YEEHAW!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon

CSA boxes ready to get filled. Photo by Scott David Gordon. CSA boxes ready to get filled. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Transplanting. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplanting. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Basil babies. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Basil babies. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Tomato fields. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Tomato fields. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Vineyards. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Vineyards. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Grapes a-growin'. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Grapes a-growin'. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Vineyard. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Vineyard. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Garlic. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Garlic. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Farm tour. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Farm tour. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

One happy dude. Photo by Scott David Gordon. One happy dude. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Blossom + bee. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Blossom + bee. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Watering transplants. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Watering transplants. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Tizzy of tomatoes. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Tizzy of tomatoes. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

MAGENTA HAND PIES WITH SPICED LENTILS, BROWN BUTTER LEEKS + GOAT CHEESE

04/27/17 — Heydon Hatcher

purple+goat+cheese+handpies.+mackannecheese-2By The World in a Pocket

The bits and bobs from a quick refrigerator survey before you go out of town, before you need to make space for your new CSA (yes, #blessed), are also strong building blocks for a pragmatic pastry or a down-to-earth-dumpling. If it tastes good before you put it in a pocket, there is a solid chance it will be even better when you mix it with something else that also tastes good. Pockets also serve as a solid solution for forgotten produce in the back of your crisper, shriveled and softer than they should be, but not too far gone. Leftovers and stragglers can take on a whole new life wrapped up in a tender dumpling skin or a flaky pastry, and less food goes to waste all around.

Perishables in our fridge, before we leave town for 5 days:
  • Purple sweet potatoes, roasted
  • 1 big whole roasted beet
  • A little over a cup of cooked lentils, spiced with whole cumin and coriander
  • 2 sad leeks
  • Not even half a glass of Pinot Grigio
  • 2 opened, partially consumed packages of goat cheese
Photo by The World in a Pocket Photo by The World in a Pocket

The leeks are gritty, so I chop those first and put them in a bowl filled with water to loosen up the dirt while I think about what to do with everything else. Purple sweet potatoes mashed with a deep red beet make a special shade of magenta. Stirring in the lentils with salt and pepper seems to be the simplest approach. Done. I skim the leeks from the top of the bowl full of water and marvel for a second at the amount of dirt that remains at the bottom, silently thanking an old boyfriend for teaching me that trick when I was 21, never having a thought about a leek before I moved to NYC in 2006. I melt 2 tablespoons of butter as I rinse the leeks one more time. The butter has browned by the time the leeks go into the saucepan with a big pinch of salt, and they cook for about 2 minutes before I empty the white wine into the pan and turn up the heat. Once the liquid is reduced, (about 5 minutes), I stir what remains of the leeks/brown butter/white wine into the sweet potato mixture. That all goes into the fridge while I roll out the dough.

The well-tested recipe for empanada dough from Epicurious is my go-to for hand pies and empanadas. I double the recipe because I am never upset about extra pie dough. I cut the dough into circles using a cocktail tumbler, which makes about 20 small hand pies-- just the right amount of dough-to-filling ratio this time around. I roll & cut the dough on a piece of parchment paper that will fit right onto a baking sheet. Each hand pie takes two pieces of round dough. A tablespoon of the sweet potato mixture onto one disc, topped with a sprinkle of goat cheese, then covered with another disc of dough. The tines of a dinner fork pressed around the edges seal each pie, tops pricked. The cookie sheet full of savory pies goes into the freezer for 20 minutes before I take it out and carefully place the pockets in a ziplock bag and put them back.

Photo by The World in a Pocket. Photo by The World in a Pocket.

Check out the wonders of The World in a Pocket's IG here.

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF APR 24TH

04/25/17 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Apr 24th CSA Box Contents Week of Apr 24th

Large Box
Beet, Golden
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Cauliflower
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Herb, Fennel
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green
Parsnip
Squash, Yellow
Medium Box
Beet, Golden
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Herb, Fennel
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green
Squash, Yellow
Small Box
Beet, Red
Carrot, Rainbow
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Kale, Dino
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Squash, Yellow
Turnip, White Japanese
Individual Box
Beet, Red
Carrot, Rainbow
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Onion, Green
Radish, Red
Squash, Yellow

MUSTARD GREEN STROGANOFF

04/24/17 — Heydon Hatcher

By Megan Winfrey

Sometimes you just need a big bowl of comfort food. For me, sometimes is more like weekly. Mustard greens add a peppery punch to this classic beef stroganoff, making it even more hearty and satisfying.

Mustard Green Stroganoff
  • 1 tbs. olive oil
  • 2 tbs. butter
  • 1 medium onion, diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 bunch of mustard greens, chopped
  • 1 lb. ground beef or venison
  • 3 tbs. all purpose flour
  • 1 tbs. paprika
  • 1/4 cup IPA beer (I used Castaway IPA by Kona Brewing Co.)
  • 4 cups beef stock
  • 4 cups egg noodles
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 3/4 cup sour cream
  • Shredded fresh parmesan, for garnish
unnamed-1

Heat the oil and butter, over medium, in a large dutch oven or pasta pot.

Add the onion and cook until softened, about 4 or 5 minutes. Add the garlic and beef, season with salt and pepper, and break the meat up with the tip of your wooden spoon.

Cook, stirring throughout, until no longer pink, about 7 minutes. Sprinkle the flour and paprika over the meat mixture and cook, stirring, for 1-2 minutes.

Add the beer, stir, and scrape up the crusty pits off the bottom of the pan. Let cook for 1-2 minutes until almost absorbed. Add the broth, more salt and pepper, and stir. Increase the heat and bring to a simmer.

Add the noodles, reduce the heat to medium low and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the noodles are cooked to al dente. Once pasta is cooked, add mustard greens and heat for 1 or so minutes.

Remove from the heat and stir in the sour cream, season as needed. Ladle into deep bowls and top with cheese.

FROM THE FARMER'S PERSPECTIVE: SEATTLE + UPCOMING FARM EVENTS!

04/21/17 — Heydon Hatcher

I popped over to Seattle this weekend to see one of my oldest and closest friends, Todd Martin. As a fellow Alabamian, we used to roll around Enterprise on bikes and skateboards when we were young whippersnappers. During the weekends, we would spend a lot of quality time together sailing on my dad’s catamaran. We were both unconventional kids, so when the working world was on our horizon, our entrepreneurial spirits really started to shine. Instead of working under someone else, we decided to start our own yard business and call the shots. We were just two high school kids running the Enterprise yard circuit with riding lawnmowers and all the accoutrement. Fancy that! When it was time to pursue higher learning, we packed up, sold the business, and headed to Auburn. War Eagle!

Seattle dock scene. Seattle dock scene.

Post-college, Todd and I moved to Wyoming, and whilst I worked for the government, he dove into the glass-making world. I often collaborated with him in the studio during my time off, using my engineering sensibilities to help him mix other materials into the glass and create new color blends. We eventually parted ways... I headed to Texas’ fair capital city to bask in warmer temperatures, and he headed to Seattle to establish himself in the Northwest as a bona fide glass artist.

Good ole days with Todd and co. Good ole days with Todd and Co.

Todd and I. Todd and I.

Todd and I. Todd and I.

The last time I visited was 15 years ago, so it was ripe time to give old Todd a visit. We spent the weekend moseying around town, taking in the sights, and eating our way through town. One oyster house we visited had over a hundred different types of oysters, can you believe it? If ever in town, do yourself a favor and visit Elliott’s Oyster House along with The Walrus and the Carpenter... they can do no wrong. Take a friend, savor the extensive array of oyster-offerings, and relish the inimitable ambiance! We had a blast.

Elliott's Oyster House. Elliott's Oyster House.

The Walrus and the Carpenter. The Walrus and the Carpenter.

If you know me, you know that I couldn’t take a trip without checking out the farmers market scene; thus, Sunday was spent navigating the town's markets. West Seattle Farmers Market, Ballard Farmers Market, and Pikes Place Market (which is probably the most recognizable of all markets... picture the giant neon "Public Market Center' sign) were all on Todd's curated Seattle market route.The Ballard Farmers Market is considered one of the best in Washington state, and was in an older area of town. I cherished seeing some of the historical Seattle architecture while browsing the market stands. Despite being the very beginning of their season, the markets were immensely vibrant, the folks were super knowledgeable and friendly, and the menu of fish was incredible. Washington's seafood is hard to rival.

It was such a great trip... What a great town! If ever you find yourself in the Pacific Northwest, give Seattle a visit! 'Til next time!

PS - Scroll down for some awesome upcoming farm events! You won't want to miss 'em!

Fish stand. Fish stand.

IMG_6852 Some great oysters!

Yum! Yum!

Stunning flowers. Stunning flowers.

Such a great town. Such a great town.

UPCOMING FARM EVENTS!

THIS WEEKEND: This Saturday, Artfest 2017 will be setup along side the Sunset Valley Farmers Market. We can't think of a better weekend to visit the Sunset Valley Market.

On Sunday, the Edible Austin Children's Picnic will be going on at Rosewood Park, and we will be there slinging veggies. If you've got kiddos, you DO NOT want to miss this free, fun-filled day.

Beginning this Sunday at the Mueller Farmers Market, the City of Austin will be hosting several free chicken keeping classes. If you purchase a coop for a selected retailer, you can even get a $75 rebate from the city!

COMING UP! On Thursday May 18th, we'll be hosting a Meet the Farmer(s) Happy Hour at The ABGB from 6-8pm. Perfect opportunity for all you central and south Austinites to come and hang with your farmers and friends!

Beginning Next Monday (4/24), we will begin to accept volunteers on Mondays at our Hergotz Location. If you've been hankering to put your free Monday to good use, join us!

Also, Happy Earth Day from JBG (4/22), we sure do cherish and love our home planet!

WEEK 16 IN PHOTOS

04/21/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Farmers market bounty. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

By Becky Hume and Montana Stovall

Week 16 was a busy week as always! Our panting crew is currently getting melons, summer squash/zucchini, butternut squash, and okra in the ground.

We just finished planting 49440 tomato plants! We are currently hiring a tomato crew and starting to put out stakes, cages and stringing them up. It is going to be one of JBG's best tomato years yet! Brenton has chosen some exquisite varieties and we are sure to have a bumper crop. We started harvesting cauliflower and cabbage this week and are forecasting a great potato crop this year as well, as growing conditions for them have been almost perfect recently.

Otherwise, we are still in the process of planting pecan, persimmon, pomegranate, fig, and pear trees. It will be a few years before these bear fruit but it is exciting to have begun diversifying. Our grapes are two years old now and have are setting great looking fruit. We are all (literally) looking forward to the fruits of our labor!

We also visited one of our favorite markets this past week, the Texas Farmers' Market at Mueller. Amy, Sagan, Eric, and Adams were slingin' at market as per usual. Be sure to give them a visit and a high five if the Mueller market is on your radar this weekend.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Happy shopper. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Golden beets. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Golden beets. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Mueller market set-up. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Mueller market set-up. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Radishing reds. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Radishing reds. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Carrot bunches. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Carrot bunches. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Loot. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Sagan and Amy. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Sagan and Amy. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Collards. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Collard harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Collard harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Lettuce head details. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Lettuce head details. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Rows and rows. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Rows and rows. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Dandelion green harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Dandelion green harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Rainbow chard details. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Rainbow chard details. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Tomato cages on tomato cages. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Tomato cages on tomato cages. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Transporting more tomato cages. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transporting more tomato cages. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Primroses galore out at the farm. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Primroses galore out at the farm. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Tomatoes on the way. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Tomatoes on the way. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Ah, the beauty of beets. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Ah, the beauty of beets. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Workin' hard. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Workin' hard. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Back forty views. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Back forty views. Photo by Scott David Gordon.
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